It’s no secret that heroin use can lead to serious medical conditions, and even death by overdose. The “high” that heroin gives the user typically prompts further use in order to attain that pleasurable rush again and again, which can easily lead to addiction. In fact, it’s estimated that approximately 23 percent of people who use heroin become hooked on it, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. With continued use, heroin causes the person to crave increasingly higher doses of the narcotic in order to feel the same effect. The body then needs the drug just to function every day, which leads to withdrawal symptoms within a short amount of time if the person stops using it. 

It’s no secret that heroin use can lead to serious medical conditions, and even death by overdose…

The “high” that heroin gives the user typically prompts further use in order to attain that pleasurable rush again and again, which can easily lead to addiction. In fact, it’s estimated that approximately 23 percent of people who use heroin become hooked on it, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. With continued use, heroin causes the person to crave increasingly higher doses of the narcotic in order to feel the same effect. The body then needs the drug just to function every day, which leads to withdrawal symptoms within a short amount of time if the person stops using it. 

If you’ve used heroin, there are some tell-tale signs of heroin use that can help you determine whether or not you have an addiction. First and foremost, if you feel as if you can’t shake off the craving of having more and more of the drug to get high, you might be an addict. Those who are addicted also feel strange when the drug wears off, such as experiencing agitation, depression, and nausea. Addicts spend the better part of the day thinking about heroin, and continually lose interest in the things they once loved to do. The obsession with the drug eventually negatively affects performance in the workplace, as well as relationships with friends and family. Other heroin addiction signs include physical changes, such as a change in weight, having shakes or tremors, and frequently experience a bloody nose.

The risks of addiction are obvious. Aside from ruining your social, family and professional life, the drug will ultimately alter your brain functioning, and cause harmful consequences to your physical health, including liver or kidney disease, lung conditions, heart disease, and even a heightened risk of communicable diseases from sharing needles. Accidental heroin overdose is highly likely, leading to brain damage and even death. Luckily, there are treatment options available that can help heroin addicts get off the drug for good, and allow them to go on to lead a healthy, fulfilling life without the need to depend on the drug. Detox and rehab programs led by industry professionals are often the key to learning how to alter the thoughts and behaviors that make you more likely to use heroin, in conjunction with medications to help overcome heroin detox symptoms. If you suspect that you have an addiction to heroin, take the following survey to help you determine whether or not you should talk to your doctor about possible treatment.